Ways of the Wise 2


Having listened to the Preeminent Warrior’s political situation, presented in a five-minute oral presentation that had ended with the question, “Will a grandson of Ramogi ever be the Premier of this country?” the Seer gave the Warrior an immediate response—a very unsettling response.

“I have not seen your imminent ascendancy at the horizon, even as your future is bright,” Thomas responded in a very flat tone—an almost emotionless tone.

“What is that?” the Warrior asked. The Seer’s response had surprised him because he, the Preeminent Warrior, had not asked about the possibility of his ascendancy to the Premiership. His question had been a general one, yet he got back a specific response.

“Your ascendancy is not imminent,” Thomas, the Seer, said with a tonal finality that cleared any doubts in the visitor’s mind.

“But you also said that I have a bright future. How can that be, if I can’t ascend to the Premiership?” the Warrior had almost shouted as he said this, but lowered his tone in response to a hand signal from the Seer. Nobody shouted at the Seer.

“Yes. Not of this country,” the Seer responded.

“Then how can my future be bright?” asked the Warrior.

“My fellow elder, how many people did not see the

light of day, and did not feel the warmth of this sun, today?

Some must have died traveling on roads; some succumbed to hunger, and others to disease. Yet, you and I are blessed to be sharing this moment over a pot of tea.”

“You amaze me, My Seer,” the Warrior said in resignation.

The truth can be damning. Still, he was sore. “How can a Ramogi Warrior be reduced to mere existence? Wasn’t his purpose in life supposed to be higher than just being alive?”

The Pre-eminent Warrior wanted to ask the Seer that, but

recoiled at the thought.

But the Seer could have been reading his mind: “Not at all. You cannot be a candidate for the Premiership from the grave,” Thomas continued to nail his point into the Warrior’s sore self-esteem.

“I have seen the point,” grumbled the Warrior.

“But you are going to be a great man in other ways. The

future of this Nation, and the world are tied to your life.”

“So all the noises about my being ahead in the current

polls is for nothing?”

“Not at all. That is why you have a bright future,” the Seer uttered these words to mollify the Warrior’s feelings.

“There is no way out?” the warrior asked.

In asking this question, the Warrior had thought that the Seer had visions of what the future had held, and if the brightness could have been changed.

“My friend, a Seer sees what is coming. He also may see what could have been but won’t because it could have been sweet but short-lived—only to be very bitter in the long run.”

Is it?” the Pre-eminent Warrior asked expectantly.

“The Seer also sees a traumatic path; a path traumatic at the beginning, only to be very bright at the end,” the Seer offered the final piece of the riddle from his mind.

“Do I have a choice?”

“The word I gave at the beginning is what you need,

and not what you asked for,” the Seer implored the expectant

Warrior.

The Pre-eminent Warrior thought for a while then

asked, “You really can see all of that?”

“My fellow elder, are you losing faith in my work? I have told you what I see,” the Seer said.

The Pre-eminent Warrior was at a loss on what to say. He felt like asking to be given either the short-lived bliss or the traumatic beginning, but could not.

“My friend, I can see that your heart is heavy.”

“True.”

“Can you be happy to be the Premier in two months, but from a wheel chair?”

“Are you offering that?”

“I offer nothing. I don’t have that ability. Do you need this thing so badly that you would lose your limbs for it?” queried the Seer.

“I am sorry. I didn’t mean that. Can I withdraw my Candidacy then?” the Pre-eminent Warrior asked.

“How could your future be bright if you were to do that?” challenged the Seer.

Having listened to the Pre-eminent Warrior’s political situation, presented in a five-minute oral presentation that had ended with the question, “Will a grandson of Ramogi ever be the Premier of this country?” the Seer gave the Warrior an immediate response—a very unsettling response.

“I have not seen your imminent ascendancy at the horizon, even as your future is bright,” Thomas responded in a very flat tone—an almost emotionless tone.

“What is that?” the Warrior asked. The Seer’s response had surprised him because he, the Pre-eminent Warrior, had not asked about the possibility of his possible ascendancy. His question had been a general one, yet he got back a specific response.

“Your ascendancy is not imminent,” Thomas, the Seer, said with a tonal finality that cleared any doubts in the visitor’s mind.

“But you also said that I have a bright future. How can that be if I cannot ascend to the Premiership?” the Warrior had almost shouted as he said this, but lowered his tone in response to a hand signal from the Seer. Nobody shouted at the Seer.

“Yes. Not of this country,” the Seer responded.

“Then how can my future be bright?” asked the Warrior.

“My fellow elder, how many people did not see the

light of day, and did not feel the warmth of this sun, today?

Some must have died traveling on roads; some succumbed to hunger, and others to disease. Yet, you and I are blessed to be sharing this moment over a pot of tea.”

“You amaze me, My Seer,” the Warrior said in resignation.

The truth can be damning. Still, he was sore. “How can a Ramogi Warrior be reduced to mere existence? Wasn’t his purpose in life supposed to be higher than just being alive?”

The Pre-eminent Warrior wanted to ask the Seer that, but

recoiled at the thought.

But the Seer could have been reading his mind: “Not at all. You cannot be a candidate for the Premiership from the grave,” Thomas continued to nail his point into the Warrior’s sore self-esteem.

“I have seen the point,” grumbled the Warrior.

“But you are going to be a great man in other ways. The

future of this Nation, and the world are tied to your life.”

“So all the noises about my being ahead in the current

polls is for nothing?”

“Not at all. That is why you have a bright future,” the Seer uttered these words to mollify the Warrior’s feelings.

“There is no way out?” the warrior asked.

In asking this question, the Warrior had thought that the Seer had visions of what the future had held, and if the brightness could have been changed.

“My friend, a Seer sees what is coming. He also may see what could have been but won’t because it could have been sweet but short-lived—only to be very bitter in the long run.”

Is it?” the Pre-eminent Warrior asked expectantly.

“The Seer also sees a traumatic path; a path traumatic at the beginning, only to be very bright at the end,” the Seer offered the final piece of the riddle from his mind.

“Do I have a choice?”

“The word I gave at the beginning is what you need,

and not what you asked for,” the Seer implored the expectant

Warrior.

The Pre-eminent Warrior thought for a while then

asked, “You really can see all of that?”

“My fellow elder, are you losing faith in my work? I have told you what I see,” the Seer said.

The Pre-eminent Warrior was at a loss on what to say. He felt like asking to be given either the short-lived bliss or the traumatic beginning, but could not.

“My friend, I can see that your heart is heavy.”

“True.”

“Can you be happy to be the Premier in two months, but from a wheel chair?”

“Are you offering that?”

“I offer nothing. I don’t have that ability. Do you need this thing so badly that you would lose your limbs for it?” queried the Seer.

“I am sorry. I didn’t mean that. Can I withdraw my Candidacy then?” the Pre-eminent Warrior asked.

“How could your future be bright if you were to do that?” challenged the Seer.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s